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Francois Lake is situated in the geographical center of beautiful British Columbia. At 110 kms (68 miles), it is the second longest natural lake in the province. This pristine lake is located 30 kms (19 miles) south of Burns Lake BC and 10 kms (6 miles) west of Fraser Lake at its east end. Its altitude is 715m (2346 ft). The lake is cold and deep - some reports reaching as much as 1000 feet. The lake provides excellent fishing for rainbow trout and char(lake trout). There are several campsites and bed & breakfasts spread out along its shores. Fantastic sunrise & sunsets, especially during the winter, are awe inspiring. Tourists will find a variety of service outlets and craft shops to browse both in Burns Lake and Francois Lake.

Nadina River feeds the lake at its west end and the Stelako River drains from the east end. Fishing in both river systems is available.

Access to the lake is via highway #35 running south from Burns Lake or from Fraser Lake following the road along the Stelako River . One may cross the lake using a new modern ferry operating between Northbank and Southbank. The free ferry is equipped to carry all sizes of vehicular traffic. It's normal for Francois Lake to freeze over during the winter; some years thick enough to drive on. The ferry, however, has a strong hull is capable of breaking up the ice and maintaining an open channel and allowing the ferry to operate year round.

According to the Encyclopedia of British Columbia; "Francois Lake got its current name by mistake. Traditional territory of the Carrier First Nations, they called it Nitapoen, or 'Lip Lake' because of its shape." "Early settlers mistook Nita for neto or 'white man' and the lake was named Lac des Francais because most of the early visitors to the area at that time were French Canadian voyageurs. It was then corrupted to 'Francois Lake' over the years." The lake and its several small communities have a long and interesting history beginning before the turn of the 20th century.


Francois Lake looking west
[Lyle Phillips Photo - Francois Lake looking west]

Francois Lake looking east
[Lyle Phillips Photo - Francois Lake looking east]



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FISH ON, LITTLE BROTHER    by Alan A Sandercott

He stares from his hospital window,
shackled by Crone's disease,
the world passing him by
sighing in frustration.

He cherishes memories
of family and friends,
hunting and fishing,
his passions of life.

Many admire his
courage and determination,
his refusal to relinquish
his quality of life.

Unafraid of dying, he dreams of
returning to Tweedsmuir Park
in the shadow of ancient glaciers
where the big fish bite.

In the depths of winter,
cradled by family,
the shackles break.
His new voyage begins.

Far in the distance,
beyond the Whitesails and portage,
lies the lake called Eutsuk
wherein my brother's spirit rests.

There's peace in knowing
he's there,
free amidst pristine wilderness,
in the place he loves so much.

Now, as I gaze towards those snowy peaks
I see his face,
hear his call on the evening breeze,
"Fish on."
And I smile.


Read more of my writings online at: www.sandercott.ca/booknook/

Webpage design & Maintenance by Alan A Sandercott Terrace B.C. Canada